T'boli beliefs

The architecture of the islands shows Spanish influence. Spanish brick churches built during the colonial era dominate the towns. The churches are large and different from traditional construction. It is difficult to imagine how the indigenous population in the seventeenth century was able to build them. Filipino families enjoy close kin bonds, and extended families living together are the norm. Seaports and government centers had a larger proportion of Spanish buildings with wide verandas and tiled roofs. Towns destroyed during the liberation campaign in World War II, especially in central and northern Luzon, were rebuilt using wood. Areas of Manila destroyed during World War II have been restored to their historical Spanish appearance. Newer buildings in Manila range from standard multistory offices to Western-style gated housing areas for the affluent, to tenements and shacks.

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T’Boli have very rich and sophisticated folklore and dances which are learnt by the children at early ages from old members of their families. An interesting fact is that T’boli allows polygamy especially among chieftains. A man may have a second wife with the consent of his first wife. The first wife is considered a queen and commands to the other wives.

If I have not love, I’m nothing, Udei Kuleng Helef or Call of The Cicada and Utom Udel Blila or Song of the night bird are just several suggestions for T’boli wedding music. You can find other suggestions on Internet and YouTube. T’boli wedding songs have something specific that can bring a lot of originality to your big wedding

Suspended from the hala or from any of its posts is the kalo, a loosely meshed network of rattan strips shaped according to the contour of the plates and bowls kept in it. Until some decades ago, antique Chinese plates were common place in the T’boli households, they were used for meals, and may still be seen in some houses. At present, the T’boli ordinarily used tin plates or cheap china bought from low landers, sari-sari or variety stores. These antiquw plates, some of which are beautiful Ming dynasty pieces, are highly valued by the people and play an important role in the establishment of the bride-price. They are heirlooms acquired by T’boli ancestors through barter with the lowlanders from Kiamba.

T’boli folksongs usually depict nature, of how lucky they are to witness its wealth and beauty which provides them their necessities. There are also some folksongs which depict the ideal place of T’boli people, the Lemlunay or paradise, where they have lived. Most characters of their folktales reside in this plays. And most of their folktales are set in this idealized place. They also have songs which show their way of living: farming in the highlands, and hunting in the jungle. Folksongs are also used by T’boli to praise their gods and goddesses, showing how thankful they are for the blessing they have received. T’boli people also use folksongs to express their love for someone, pouring all his emotions in a creative and poetic manner.

T'boli beliefs

t'boli beliefs

Suspended from the hala or from any of its posts is the kalo, a loosely meshed network of rattan strips shaped according to the contour of the plates and bowls kept in it. Until some decades ago, antique Chinese plates were common place in the T’boli households, they were used for meals, and may still be seen in some houses. At present, the T’boli ordinarily used tin plates or cheap china bought from low landers, sari-sari or variety stores. These antiquw plates, some of which are beautiful Ming dynasty pieces, are highly valued by the people and play an important role in the establishment of the bride-price. They are heirlooms acquired by T’boli ancestors through barter with the lowlanders from Kiamba.

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